" Got it from a doctor. 26-year-old sells newspapers, cuts grass and makes cake for study - Mas Río Negro - cifpharm

Got it from a doctor. 26-year-old sells newspapers, cuts grass and makes cake for study – Mas Río Negro

Sixto Leiva was born and raised in a poor house in Federación, Entre Ríos. At the age of 26, he finished his university studies and is already working in the hospital in his city. “I went through a lot of needs, but I couldn’t have done it on my own,” he told TN. Tonight on Buenos Aires TV, he highlighted the work of doctors, nurses, maids and other public health workers and confirmed that he wanted to specialize in cardiology.

“I know mine is getting attention or it’s news because of where I come from, but I’ve never been alone.” Sixto Leva Look at his testimony medical And he sees so much more: his roots are there, his past, his little house in the San Lorenzo neighborhood, his childhood collecting cans, selling fried cakes, handing out newspapers and mowing the lawn in the Union , between rivers. A life full of lungs and a lot of heart.

On March 12, this 26-year-old passed his last course and graduated from the National University of Entre Ríos. “I took the OSCE exam, an integrative exam that presented a placement problem in pediatrics, clinical medicine, family health, gynecology, and emergency medicine,” he said. T.

In that vigil at the headquarters Uruguay conceptgathering of family, friends and neighbors; Foam handles, torn paper bags and feel Years of struggle and effort.

“I was born and raised in a household of structural poverty. I’m the son of two union workers. I did primary and secondary studies in a public school in my city, I studied at Concepción ”, Leva introduces herself.

Childhood in Community Kitchens and Newspaper Distribution: The Sixto Leyva Story

In the crisis of 2001When he was barely 5 years old and his parents were unemployed, Sixto ate in community kitchens. “The people of the city know me from those places. We face a lot of needs at home,” he says.

The boy went to school from Monday to Friday, and on the way home he always paid attention to the floor. “I was collecting small cans, anything that was useful to me to sell. He remembers that he sold copper and aluminum. He continues, “At Christmas and New Years, I always took the bottles off the street to collect a few pesos and buy things for myself.”

At that time, his mother was cooking Fried donuts and buns. Sixto, basket in hand, sold it on the street. When Saturday came, I went out to give birth FederaenseCity newspaper. Thus, the boy became famous among the neighbors.

“Although I am aware of all my efforts, my parents did not allow me to miss anything when I studied at Concepcion,” comments the new doctor. He continues, “I appreciate very much that I was able to get into a public university. I was able to study and graduate. Being poor, I couldn’t afford a private one.”

The first member of the family to graduate from university: “I did not become a doctor alone”

Sixto also notes that scholarships helped him build a dream of being the first in his family to graduate from university. “I had the Progress and the inopiprogen, which is interrupts. I still have the computer connect equalityand I’ll tell you more: I did the final work there,” he says.

That’s why I always say I never became a doctor on my own. Studying at a public university is a right that I was able to exercise thanks to the fact that there were social conflicts before they invaded,” he states.

The present finds him with a professional title and a job: Dr. Sixto Leyva works in the San Jose Hospital office Monday through Friday, working shifts and plans to work in primary care, where his great passion is rooted.

“I am very interested in community work, and the practice of medicine from a holistic and holistic perspective. It allows me to communicate with the patient’s environmentwhich greatly affects their physical and mental health.” He adds: “In the future, I would like to specialize in cardiology.” It’s just that Dr. Leva puts his heart into everything.

Mariano Lopez Blascoin Tennessee

Another view

This is the story of Sixto Leyva, a young man from the Federal District, a resident of the neighborhood of San Lorenzo, who managed to graduate as a doctor at Concepción del Uruguay with a great effort on his part and his family in March.

The doctor proves his origins and is happy to have achieved the goal of graduating in the profession he is passionate about. In which you intend to focus on an integrated and comprehensive vision for its practice

“I do not believe in merit, although I managed to graduate, my family and the state were present through scholarships to help me,” the young man highlights.

On the other hand, he reaffirms that people living in poverty and children of workers, as in his case, have access to social progress through study, and he states, in addition, that the poor go to public universities. He is the first member of his family to gain access to higher education.

“I completed my entire career using my computer they gave me in 2013 when I was about to finish. It was one of the Connect Equality programmes. That is why I say that the role of the state and the role of the state university is very important,” Sixto highlights.

He comes from a family of workers who have always accompanied him. That’s why the doctor comments: “My mom made the cake and went out to sell it. People know me because I went and left him the newspaper. The union members know me from there. I also cut the grass, and at Concepción del Uruguay I make little changuitas so I can get something. So I So glad to be a person, for being poor, he got a degree.

Back to pay, with title right under his arm

Today, Sixto is considering turning his business over to the Federation – whose hospital is already working – because its roots are here. In the future he would like to specialize in cardiology.

“I know mine is getting attention or it’s news because of where I come from, but I’ve never been alone.” Sixto Leyva looks back at his medical degree and sees so much more: his roots, his past, his small home in the San Lorenzo neighborhood, and his childhood collecting cans, selling fried donuts, handing out newspapers and mowing grass in the Union. A life full of lungs and a lot of heart.

On March 12, this 26-year-old passed his last course and graduated from the National University of Entre Ríos. “I took the OSCE, an integrative exam that presented a placement problem in pediatrics, clinical medicine, family health, gynecology, and emergency medicine,” he says.

There, on that vigil at the Concepcion de Uruguay, family members, friends, and neighbors assembled; Foam handles, shredded paper bags, and the passion of years of struggle and effort have been combined.

“I was born and raised in a household suffering from structural poverty. I am the son of two union workers. I did primary and secondary studies in a public school in my city, and studied at Concepción ”, Leva introduces herself.

Childhood in community kitchens and newspaper distribution

In the crisis of 2001, when he was just 5 years old and his parents were unemployed, Sixto was eating in community kitchens. “City people know me from those places. We face a lot of needs at home,” he says.

The boy went to school from Monday to Friday, and on the way home he always paid attention to the floor. “I was collecting small cans, whatever was useful to me to sell. He remembers selling copper and aluminium.

“At Christmas and New Years, I always took the bottles off the street to collect a few pesos and buy things for myself,” he said in an interview with TN.

At that time, her mother was cooking fried cakes and donuts. Sixto, basket in hand, sold it on the street. When Saturday came, he was out to distribute the city’s Federal newspaper. Thus, the boy became famous among the neighbors.

“Although I am aware of all my efforts, my parents did not allow me to miss anything when I studied at Concepcion,” comments the new doctor. He continues, “I appreciate very much that I was able to get into a public university. I was able to study and graduate. Being poor, I couldn’t afford a private one.”

The first member of the family to graduate from university: “I did not become a doctor alone”

Sixto also notes that scholarships helped him build a dream of being the first in his family to graduate from university. “I had Progresar and Inaubepro, which are regional. I still have a Connect Equality computer, and I’ll say more: I did the final work there,” he says.

That’s why I always say I never became a doctor on my own. Studying at a public university is a right that I was able to exercise thanks to the fact that there were social conflicts before they invaded,” he states.

The present finds him with a professional title and a job: Dr. Sixto Leyva works in the San Jose Hospital office Monday through Friday, working shifts and plans to work in primary care, where his great passion is rooted.

“I am very interested in community work, and the practice of medicine from a holistic and holistic perspective. It allows me to connect with the patient’s environment, which greatly affects his physical and mental health.” “In the future, I would like to specialize in cardiology,” he adds. It’s just that Dr. Leva puts a heart into everything.

Source: Free Between Rivers

Leave a Comment